Timeline of Events for High School Students

Oftentimes homeschooled students miss out on opportunities because they are unaware of available events as well as the deadlines associated with certain opportunities. Planning ahead will help your students successfully complete high school and be well prepared for life after graduation. Below are suggestions to consider for each grade of high school. There are links included that will direct you to sites with more information or past blog posts that address particular subject matters. Some of the information is repeated in more than one grade and, although it may seem redundant, it allows parents to skip to a later grade if their students have already completed an earlier grade.

General Advice:  

Begin helping the student discover his/her gifts and talents. Discuss classes to include in the high school years.  English, history, science and math in addition to classes that interest the student, encourage character, teach computer skills, and more. Include specialized classes or co-ops that encourage the talents and interests of the student when possible. Be aware that there may be state requirements regarding particular courses necessary for a homeschooled student to earn state grants. In addition, some colleges have certain requirements regarding classes that should be included on a student’s high school transcript. Not all colleges require two years of the same foreign language in high school, but some do. Most expect to see four credits of English, three or four years of math, three credits of science (with at least one lab), and three credits social studies. Many states have added a half credit for personal finance to their suggested guidelines. There are no laws regarding the credits a homeschooled student needs to graduate, only guidelines, but knowing the requirements for state grants as well as the expectations of the colleges your student is considering will help you plan to meet your state’s requirements and the requirements of your top college choices. The state of Tennessee does not require a homeschooled student to take particular classes in order to earn state grants, but an ACT or SAT score is required. Some states may require certain GPAs, test scores and/or community service for grants. The grants often have deadlines for application so be sure you are aware of that information before the student begins his senior year. Bryan College does not have specific requirements for high school courses but, depending on the student’s desired major, certain high school classes may be recommended by faculty members. For instance, if a student plans to pursue an Engineering degree, then taking an increased number of math and science classes during high school will help better prepare the student for that major.

Opportunities: Discover local opportunities for co-ops, classes, athletic, music, drama, and additional events that may be worth pursuing. Look into Civil Air Patrol and TeenPact. Join a local speech and debate club (or, in the absence of a local club, start one). STOA and NCFCA are two Christian homeschool speech and debate clubs. One of my regrets after homeschooling my 9 for more than 32 years is not getting involved in speech and debate clubs until my oldest four had completed high school. 

9th grade

Transcripts:  Keep records to be inserted in a transcript including subjects studied along with credits and grades earned. If you would like to use the Transcript Genie offered for free by Bryan College to build a professional-looking transcript (it even calculates and weights grades), go to this link, scroll down and enter your email address. There is also a free eBook called The Journey that you can request and it will provide information on testing, scholarships, and more.

Community Service:  Look for opportunities for your student (and/or the entire family) to participate in volunteer opportunities, ministries, camps, classes, and more. Keep a record of volunteer hours and hold on to any certificates earned.

Portfolio:  Begin collecting and filing documents that provide proof of the student’s participation in community service, mission trips, camps, classes, athletic events, awards, certifications, and more. If your student is featured in an article, add a copy of the article to the portfolio. If your student has work published, include that in the portfolio.

Testing:  Participate in the PSAT testing if possible. This is an affordable test for students offered in October and, in 2021, an additional test date in January was added. Register your student for the CLT10. Students can take this test several times a year at home, for free, on a computer, with the parent proctoring. Parents can order the analytics for a small fee.

Summer:  Check out camps, mission trips, internships and apprenticeships that might interest your student.  A student of this age can often be trained to work at camps, gaining experience, responsibility, and qualifications for potential summer job opportunities. Making money, although beneficial, should not always be the deciding factor when choosing between opportunities. Students may gain more experience and character growth in volunteer positions.

Dual Enrollment: Look into dual enrollment classes for the 10th grade year. Dual enrollment is a great opportunity as it allows a student to earn both high school and college credit at the same time, but it is not without dangers. Homeschooled students often make a few mistakes pertaining to dual enrollment and this post will help you avoid those mistakes. Choosing which dual enrollment class a student should take is also important.  

10th grade

If the state in which you live offers grants and scholarships for dual enrollment and college then find out the qualifications for participation in order to make sure your student meets the requirements. Bryan College allows 10th graders to take dual enrollment classes but the requirements are more stringent than the requirements for 11th and 12th graders, so planning ahead to meet those requirements is important.

Plan classes according to academic needs, talents and interest, and opportunity.

Testing:  Participate in the PSAT testing that takes place if possible. Register your student for the CLT10. Students can take this free test several times a year at home, on a computer, with the parent proctoring. Parents can order the analytics for a small fee. 10th graders taking the CLT10 may qualify for scholarships offered by the CLT. Consider having your student take college entrance exams, particularly if test scores are required for dual enrollment classes. Most colleges accept both the ACT and the SAT. Many Christian colleges accept the CLT.

College Credits: If your student is ready to take college classes, find a college that is a good fit for your student. (Bryan College offers online classes four times a year with out-of-state scholarships.)  Be sure you discover guidelines for dual enrollment because, in some instances, college entrance exam test scores are required. Consider CLEP and AP possibilities for additional college credit. 

Opportunities: Discover local opportunities for co-ops, classes, athletes, music, drama, and additional opportunities. Look into Civil Air Patrol and TeenPact. Join a local speech and debate club (or, in the absence of a local club, start one) STOA or NCFCA

Summer:  Consider dual enrollment classes, camps, mission trips, internships and apprenticeships.  A student of this age can often be trained to work at camps, gaining experience, responsibility, and qualifications for potential summer job opportunities.  

11th grade

Plan classes according to academic needs, talents and interest, and opportunity.

If the state in which you live offers grants and scholarships for dual enrollment and college, find out the qualifications for participation.

Preparing for College: Attend college fairs and visit colleges of interest. Take college entrance exams, pinpoint weaknesses and tutor to the weakness. Purchase materials that will help improve test scores. Consider on-line tutoring for test prep such as 36 University (enter code “bryan” and save $3 a month, reducing the price to $12 a month). Schedule campus visits at colleges of interest. Begin with the virtual tours offered online, and visit in person when possible, preferably when classes are taking place so the student can attend classes. Begin applying to colleges of interest when permitted (find out if there are events or times when the application fees are waived). Research scholarship and grant opportunities offered by the state in which you live, the colleges you are considering, as well as independent scholarships. This article gives suggestions for making college affordable.

Testing:  Discover opportunities for taking the PSAT the summer before, or at the beginning of the 11th grade year. It is the score from the PSAT taken during the 11th grade year that qualifies students for National Merit Scholarships. A National Merit Semi-finalist receives full tuition at Bryan College.

November:  Answers in Genesis sponsors a free college expo for high school students that includes a free ticket to the Ark and the possibility of winning a $500 scholarship.

Summer:  Consider attending camps that are held at the college your student is considering attending. Request a FAFSA ID for student and parent in order to fill out the FAFSA the senior year.

12th grade

Plan classes according to academic needs, talents and interest, and opportunity. If you would like to print a diploma for your student, the free e-resource mentioned, The Journey, includes an editable diploma template. None of my nine children have ever needed a diploma. What they did need was a completed transcript.

Continue attending college fairs and visiting colleges of interest unless a firm decision has been made at this time. 

If the state in which you live offers grants and scholarships for dual enrollment (and college) find out the qualifications for participation early in the year because deadlines are often tied to certain opportunities. If your state offers grants for college, but you know your student will be attending an out-of-state college, then using the college grant (borrowing against it) for dual enrollment will save you money in the long run. Students planning to attend an in-state college may also want to borrow against a state grant for dual enrollment because the cost of dual enrollment classes is often much lower than the cost of traditional college classes.

Make sure all classes necessary for graduation are scheduled to be completed either by participation in class or by testing.  

Apply to colleges of interest. 

Continue earning college credits via dual enrollment classes, CLEP (can now be taken virtually from home) or AP tests (can now be taken from home). Continue taking college entrance exams. As a result of COVID many colleges are test optional meaning they will use a student’s GPA for merit scholarship, without requiring a test score. However, most test optional colleges will accept test scores and use the scores to award scholarship amounts if the exam score increases the amount a student can earn beyond what the GPA entitles the student to be awarded.

Attend scholarship events (when applicable) that take place at the college of interest.  At Bryan College these events take place once during each semester.  These are invitation only events, extended to qualifying seniors who have applied to Bryan College and each participant receives additional scholarship funds of varying amounts based on an interview with faculty or staff.

Be sure your student has developed time management skills. If the student is taking a dual enrollment class or attending a structured co-op then, more-than-likely, the student is honing these skills. This article offers five steps to help students improve their study skills.

October:  Fill out the FAFSA. You may want to wait a few days because the first few days are filled with so many families completing the FAFSA that the site gets bogged down. But, do not wait too long because in certain situations scholarships may be first come, first serve.

November:  Answers in Genesis sponsors a free college expo for high school students that includes a free ticket to the Ark and the possibility of winning a $500 scholarship.

Spring:  Be sure all subjects necessary for graduation will be completed.  There may be state requirements for homeschooled students to complete specific courses in order to earn state grants. Some colleges have certain requirements regarding classes that should be included on a student’s transcript. Make sure all requirements are met. Continue taking college entrance exams if higher scores are needed for scholarships. 

Summer:  Consider sending your student to camps that are held at the college your student plans to attend if that’s an option. At Bryan College a senior enrolled at Bryan will earn a small scholarship for attending Bryan’s Summer Institute. A high school graduate can also dual enroll with Bryan College the summer after graduation. If your student plans to live on campus, then he may very well find a suitable roommate while attending the camp.

The earlier you start preparing your high school student for success, the better it will be for everyone involved. However, if you are like I was with my oldest kiddos, and you are late to the game, do what you can to play catch up and make up for lost time. Even though my older students were ill prepared (thanks to my lack of knowledge concerning many of these issues), they did well after high school. Could they have done better or had an easier time getting to where they wanted to go had I better prepared them? Probably, but I was doing all I knew to do at that time. Give yourself some grace and utilize the information that is available to you and your students now that you are aware of the options and opportunities. Feel free to email me at pat.wesolowski@bryan.edu if you have any questions or if I can help in any way.

Making College Affordable — How Your Students Can Increase Scholarship Awards and Take Advantage of Additional Opportunities

a-l-l-e-f-v-i-n-i-c-i-u-s-468838-unsplashThe largest college scholarship amounts awarded to students are generally academic scholarships. In light of the that, having your students do whatever they can to increase their academic scholarship is a worthy goal. In addition to college scholarships, there are often additional grants, programs and events that come with funds for college. Below are a few suggestions to consider in order to make college affordable.

Convincing your students to be intentional about test prep is not as easy as it sounds. Studying beforehand and being rested and refreshed the morning of the test is very important. Earning top scholarship dollars for college while in high school, however, will enable students to attend the college of their choice, graduating with little to no student debt. Unfortunately many high school students want to enjoy the high school experience without being bothered  with thinking about (much less preparing for) college. As nice as that may sound (to the student), the reality is that the students who plan and prepare during high school are the ones who can afford their college of choice, making the college experience more affordable and enjoyable.

Most colleges grant academic scholarships based on the highest test score earned prior to a student being enrolled at the college. Even if the last test taken was a lower score than a previous test, colleges will usually award the scholarship based on the highest score andrew-neel-308138-unsplashearned. (You will see the words “generally,” “usually,” and “often” because this information may vary with each college.)

Some colleges super score college exams which means they will take the highest score earned in each section across numerous test dates. This is beneficial to students who take these tests multiple times, but not all colleges super score and those that do may only super score one of the college exams and not the others. Hopefully, if your students are looking for scholarships then they have also narrowed their top college choices. Find out which exams, if any, the college super scores because it might be to your students’ advantage to take that particular exam multiple times.

If you are not aware, there is now a third college exam in addition to the ACT and the SAT that is accepted by more than 140 colleges. Most of the colleges accepting this test CLT logofor admission, as well as for scholarship awards, are Christian colleges, but not all. This exam is the CLT (Classic Learning Test). For more about testing, check out this article.

The best way to prepare your students to earn academic scholarships is to provide opportunities for the students to test at an early age. The PSAT can be taken years before the junior year (which is the year this test determines National Merit Scholars). CLT has a CLT8 and a CLT10 that students can take for free, from home. The CLT10 comes with scholarship potential as well. Students can take multiple practice tests for free on-line or on paper (via books that give test prep information while providing practice tests).  Once students reach the 11th grade they should take at least 2 of the college exams (and taking all 3 may offer even more advantage). Some students prefer one test over the others, earning higher scores as a result. Encourage your students to take each exam at least one time in order to find their best option.

Spending money on test prep materials often brings a great ROI (return on investment). 36 University is an affordable on-line prep for the ACT. The cost is $15 but when registering, if the code “bryan” is used then the student saves $3 per month. There is no contract or number of months required for enrollment. Another prep many students userawpixel-761474-unsplash is College Prep Genius. The founder of College Prep Genius, Jean Burk, has children who threw away bags filled with full scholarship offers. She is a great resource and often speaks at educational (and homeschool) conventions. Regardless of which college exam the student decides to take multiple times, prepping for any of these tests will more than likely increase scores on any of the exams. In other words, prepping for the ACT may very well enable the student do better on the SAT and the CLT. This article will provide more information on scholarships, including links to independent scholarship opportunities. And this article includes a list of independent scholarships. Word of advice, if you apply for outside scholarships then set up a new and separate email address because you will be bombarded with emails.

Another way to increase scholarship awards is to attend scholarship events when offered. Not all colleges sponsor these events, but when they do it is well worth finding out the criteria for qualification, deadlines, expectations, and all applicable details. Bryan College hosts a scholarship event each semester for seniors who have been accepted to Bryan who have scored a minimum ACT 21 (or comparable SAT or CLT). The event is free and each student who attends will receive anywhere from $500 (minimum) to a full ride. Opportunities such as these are ones your students will not want to miss.

Qualifying for scholarships that stack will increase award amounts as well. Find out which scholarships are offered by the colleges your students are considering so that they can be awarded every scholarship for which they qualify. Be aware that academic and athletic scholarships do not stack at all colleges. If a student accepts an athletic scholarship and then gets injured, he/she might lose the scholarship. On the other hand, if an athlete chooses the academic scholarship over the athletic scholarship and he/she does not maintain the required GPA then that scholarship will be lost. If you decide to attend a college where scholarships do not stack, start talking with your students regarding their priorities in college.  A thoughtful decision on priorities will help determine which scholarship opportunities to take.

Another way for your students to earn additional college funds is to make sure they qualify for state funding opportunities if they plan to attend college in their state of residence. Students in Tennessee have the ability to qualify for multiple state grants, but in order to do that they must be aware of the requirements for each grant in time to qualify. Homeschooled students often have additional requirements than students enrolled in pubic or private schools so if you homeschool your students, be sure you are aware of the qualifications.

Make sure you fill out the FAFSA in October of the student’s senior year. Many times fafsascholarship money is first come, first serve so being in the pool as soon as possible is a definite advantage. If your student is a senior and you have not done this, do it soon!

Many colleges also have work study programs, providing work for students with financial need so that they can earn money working on campus each semester. Also, after the completion of the freshman year, colleges often offer scholarships for ambassadors, resident assistants, and additional positions not open to freshmen. In addition to these programs there may be opportunities to join leadership programs or academies that come with scholarship potential. Your students should spend time looking at the opportunities of each college they are interested attending. Having discussions with admission counselors and financial aid counselors is advised as well.

Unless your student is already a senior in high school, do not wait until the senior year to begin planning for college. No one likes debt so the sooner you and your students plan and prepare, the better! If your student is a senior, there is still much that can be done to make college affordable. Be sure you find out from the student’s top college choices which programs and events are time sensitive so that you do not miss out on any opportunities for increased funding.

Students are inclined to make a final college choice based on finances. How much will be awarded and how much debt, if any, will be incurred. That decision may be impacted by colleges with additional opportunities that, in turn justifies a higher expense (or more debt). For instance, students who attend Bryan College after high school that graduatebryan graduation 1 with a 3.5 GPA can then earn their masters degree tuition free. That’s a huge advantage and one that will end up saving a student a lot of money. Every college is similar in many ways, but no two are exactly alike so be sure to find out everything you can about the colleges your students are pursuing.

Planning and preparing for college with intention can make the experience much more affordable and stress-free (okay, maybe not stress-free, but less stressful) than you can imagine!

 

 

 

 

Seniors, If You Are Headed to College, Wake Up and Smell the Coffee!

nathan-dumlao-507143-unsplash

I love it when teens attend my workshops with their parents so that I can tell them, to their faces, that if they are headed to college they need to be intentional about planning ahead. After homeschooling my nine children I am now the Homeschool Specialist at Bryan College and I cannot tell you how often I see seniors in high school miss out on great opportunities due to being uninformed, lazy or, worse of all, not caring about the consequences of their lack of action. Don’t be that student. Below I will list areas where you need to be informed and proactive.

  1. Take college exams seriously. The highest scholarships offered by most colleges are generally the academic scholarships! Preparing to raise your score is like having a full time job in light of the dollars one can earn with a great score. Don’t be afraid to spend a serious amount of time and money preparing for these exams.
  2. Consider taking all three college exams in order to increase scholarship potential. Find out more about the ACT, SAT and the new CLT here.
  3. Take your GPA seriously. If you are dual enrolling, make sure your grades are as matthew-sleeper-124918-unsplashhigh as possible. Scholarships are tied to the GPA as well as to the college exam score.
  4. Take advantage of opportunities in the community to serve and help others. Whether scholarships you are pursuing require that, or not, it will be a great addition to your portfolio.
  5. Narrow down your top college choices by the senior year. Visit and apply to those colleges. In order to find out what all you qualify for, as well as to find out if there are additional scholarship opportunities available, it is important to be accepted to the colleges you have chosen.
  6. If you have not taken any dual enrollment classes at a college, do so! Not only will you earn college credits affordably, but these classes will help you learn to improve your study habits and manage your time well.
  7. Add classes the senior year that will help prepare you for life. Classes such as personal finance, time management, college writing, and speech and debate!
  8. Research scholarship opportunities and take advantage of as many as possible!

Being intentional and prepared will help you avoid the mistakes made by many homeschooling families. Not only that, depending on how successful you are at earning a great GPA, along with high college exam scores, college can then become affordable!

Bryan College is very homeschool friendly and they have an affordable dual enrollment program, offering out-of-state scholarships to juniors and seniors in high school. Bryan dmytro-ostapenko-59494-unsplashalso offers a tuition-free Master’s degree to students who come to Bryan after high school and graduate with a 3.5 GPA. And, of importance to seniors, Bryan College hosts two scholarship events per year (one each semester) for qualified seniors who have been accepted to Bryan, allowing them to earn an additional $500 to a full ride for attending and participating.

Download this free e resource to help you plan the high school years! If you would like to receive more information on Bryan College, either via email or snail mail, send a request to: pat.wesolowski@bryan.edu

 

 

 

Scholarship Opportunities

scholarshipScholarships are the best way to make college affordable! The largest scholarships are generally the academic scholarships which are determined by GPAs and test scores received from college exams such as the ACT, the SAT and now the CLT. Being awarded multiple scholarships is an opportunity for high school students to make college affordable without the stress of having to take out huge loans or requiring students to work several jobs while in college. Below are links to independent scholarship opportunities as well as articles that are subject appropriate.

Raising Scores to Earn More Money: When students take college exams seriously then raising their scores in order to earn higher scholarship amounts is a goal that can be reached. Take early tests such as the PSAT and the CLT10 because they come with scholarship potential (and, generally, the more times a student takes a test the more relaxed they will be and they will perform better)! There are multiple free tutorials on-line as well as practice tests available. Two programs that many homeschooling families use are 36 University (register with the code word Bryan and save $3 per month, reducing the price from $15 to $12) and College Prep Genius. Many families have found it worthwhile to invest in preparing their students for these tests by hiring private tutors, or by taking part in test prep classes.

There are several types of scholarships, as follows:sharon-mccutcheon-552616-unsplash

  • State
  • Federal
  • College
  • Independent

State Grants:  Before (or when) your students enter high school, research the grants and scholarships offered by the state in which you live and compare them to the scholarships and grants in the state where the college is located that your students may want to attend (if outside of your state of residence). These scholarships are based on test scores, GPA and/or community service. Students will usually only qualify for state money if they have been a resident of that state during the students’ senior year (or for a year prior to attending college). For some, moving to the state where a college is located in order to qualify as in-state residents and to receive state grants is worth relocating! Knowing ahead of time what is offered will give families time to jump through required hoops or to make a move! We moved back from Florida to Tennessee before my 7th child’s senior year so he would qualify for scholarships specific to the county and to the state. (Bryan College offers a large scholarship to local seniors who attend Bryan and when we coupled that with state and federal grants his tuition was covered.)

Federal Grants: Every student (and their parents) should fill out the FAFSA in October of the senior year. The amount of money a student is eligible for is determined by the EFC (expected family contribution). Some money is limited and distributed on a first-come-first-serve basis so filling out the FAFSA as soon as possible is advised.

boy at boardCollege Scholarships: Almost every college offers a variety of scholarships. Some stack and some do not. Research the scholarship possibilities at the top colleges of your choice to find out what your students might be able to receive. At some colleges the academic and athletic scholarships do not stack. A word of advice: If your student can earn an equal amount with an academic scholarship as with an athletic scholarship, take the academic scholarship. Athletes get injured or dropped from the team and there goes the scholarship. At Bryan College the athletic and academic scholarships stack so students do not have to choose between the two. You might be surprised at some of the scholarships offered by colleges. Because Bryan College is a Christian college, they offer scholarships for students whose parents are in full time ministry. In addition there are scholarships for children of alumni, homeschooled students, and more. Bryan also has a full tuition scholarship for students living in Tennessee whose parents make less than $35,000 a year. Bryan College has scholarships related to music, theater, martial arts, the honors program and more! This is another reason to have your top college choices narrowed down, in order to compare apples with apples once you are familiar with the scholarship possibilities from each school.

Work Scholarships: Many businesses will reward high school students with financial aid for college. If a student is going to have a steady job during high school then finding a company that will help with college would be a bonus. In the past I have heard that Chic fil A, Publix and UPS have such programs, but I have not confirmed that information. If you know of businesses that do this, send me a message or comment on this post!

Independent college scholarships: Before you even begin applying for independent scholarships, set up a separate email address. Why? Because you will be bombarded with emails and offers and your contact information will be shared with other organizations. Is it worth applying for independent scholarships? Absolutely! Every little bit helps. Below are links to get started, but be sure to research your area for local scholarship opportunities that might not be offered anywhere else. Ask friends and family members if they are aware of any local businesses that offer scholarships. It may take some time and effort, but the payoff could be huge. And this article includes a list of independent scholarships. Below is a list of additional links as well as some articles to consider. michael-longmire-689531-unsplash

Scholarship Search Guide

State Scholarships 

Home Education Scholarships

Graduating Debt Free

Scholarship Sharing

Tuition Funding Source

Fast Web

Wells Fargo

Additional Outside Scholarships (Scroll down this page to see numerous additional scholarships.)

bc_9x12Added Bonuses: Check with the colleges you are considering to see if they have any  offers unique to their schools. Bryan College offers students the possibility of earning a tuition free Masters Degree if they come to Bryan after high school and graduate with a 3.5 GPA.

By the junior year in high school students should have a few top choice colleges in mind so that they will be aware of scholarship potential, both from the college as well as the state where the college is located (assuming they will reside there during their senior year). It is okay to apply to several colleges so that one can better compare the offers that come from the financial aid departments. Remember to ask about any specific scholarship opportunities available to seniors. Pursing each and every opportunity available could pay off big time. As we tell our children, “Work hard and sling mud because some of it is bound to stick.” Go get ’em!

 

A Third College Entrance Exam? Yes, Please!

CLT logoFor many years the only two college entrance exams offered to students have been the SAT and the ACT.  Oftentimes Christians have felt at a disadvantage for several reasons, to-wit:

1.  Some of the questions put the students in a moral dilemma (should students give the politically correct answer, gaining a point, or answer according to their beliefs?)

2.  The reading content often contains biases and politically charged articles that do not line up with a Christian’s beliefs

3.  The tests are aligned with Common Core and many homeschooling families as well as private schools do not teach Common Core material.

estee-janssens-zni0zgb3bkQ-unsplash

Another disadvantage to these tests is the fact that one must register for the test more than a month prior to the test or pay a hefty late fee.

These disadvantages are remedied with the new CLT (Classic Learning Test).

The CLT is offered five times a year. Writing is optional and free.  Students can sign up for the test up until a week before the test is administered.  The test is taken on-line either with a student’s device or with a device offered by the site proctoring the exam. Scores are received by the end of the day when given at a proctored sight. If given online as a virtual test, the scoring process will take longer.

The CLT is a two hour online test. The CLT8 is for 7th and 8th graders and they can take the test at home. The CLT10 is for 9th and 10th graders and they, too, take the test from home with a parent proctor. The CLT10, like the PSAT, comes with scholarship potential for high scoring students.

Here is an article put out by HSLDA comparing the SAT, ACT and CLT.

Bryan College will proctor the CLT on our campus.

The test dates and locations are found here.

Practice the test to see for yourself what it is like!  (The practice test I took included a reading passage containing an article by C. S. Lewis!)